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Posted on in Child Support

Lombard family law attorneysUntil just a few months ago, Illinois courts calculated child support as a percentage of the income of the parent with fewer parental responsibilities—referred to in the past as the non-custodial parent. Since July 1, 2017, however, a new law has brought child support guidelines in Illinois up to date with modern trends and started improving the lives of all parties involved.

The Old Child Support Law

The previous law in Illinois has long been criticized for being inequitable, with not enough potential exemptions taken into account, and an alleged unfair burden on the non-custodial parent. Under the old guidelines, there were two primary factors in determining the amount of support to be paid: the income of the non-custodial parent and the number of children to be supported.

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Posted on in Child Support

Lombard family law attorneysIf your income has declined in recent months due to a change in employment or other factors, you may be struggling to make your court-ordered child support or spousal maintenance payments. You may also be wondering if there is anything you can do about it. Can you go to the judge and have your child support and maintenance payments modified accordingly?

Changing these, and other, financial provisions in a divorce is possible under Section 510 of the Illinois Marriage and Dissolution of Marriage Act (IMDMA). Any party to the case can ask the court to modify the existing order if there has been a “substantial change in circumstances.” The statute lists a number of specific factors, as well as the general inclusion of “any other factor that the court expressly finds to be just and equitable,” for the court to take into account.

Change in Income

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Lombard family law attorneyIf you are parent facing a divorce—or breakup if you are not married—you probably understand that a child support order may be in your future. In most separated parent situations, one parent is required to make payments to the other parent to assist with the costs of raising their child. Usually, the parent with fewer responsibilities and less parenting time is the one who must provide the support, but the law allows a court to order support payments from either or both parents as appropriate.

Currently in Illinois, child support calculations are based on two primary factors: the net income of the supporting parent and the number of children that require support. Other considerations may be taken into account, but generally have less impact on the final order.

Need for Change

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Lombard child support lawyersIt seems that just a few short weeks ago, students around the country were preparing to go back to school. Retail outlets were full of pencils and notebooks, as well as dorm room furniture for those heading off to college. Suddenly, the fall semester is just about over, and most college students are looking forward to a couple weeks off before the spring semester begins. Others, however, may have rather unsatisfactory experiences at school this term along with poor grades. If you as a parent have been ordered to contribute to your child’s college expenses, his or her report card could be a sign that your obligation needs to be reevaluated.

Non-Minor Support for College Expenses

According to Illinois law, divorced parents can be required to contribute to the educational expenses of their children, even after the child has reached age 18 and started college. In ordering non-minor support, a court must take into account a number of factors, including the family’s financial situation before the divorce and each parent’s income and resources since the split. Other considerations include the child’s income and resources, such as his or her eligibility for grants, scholarships, and assistance programs. The child’s academic performance must also be factored into the decision.

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Lombard family law attorneyAlthough it may be hard to believe, Christmas is now less than three weeks away. In the upcoming days, shoppers around the country will hit the stores trying to find the right gifts for friends and family members. Most parents, of course, will be looking to fulfill the holiday wishes of their children, as they attempt to make the holiday season magical for their little ones. Sometimes, parents who are divorced or unmarried, however, may face financial challenges while they struggle to balance the cost of buying presents with their obligations for child support.

Tradition vs. the Law

Holiday gift-giving is a custom that dates back thousands of years. In the Christian tradition, three traveling kings—sometimes just referred to as the Three Wise Men—visited the infant Jesus bearing gifts for the child. The practice, however, is even older than that, as pagans and Ancient Romans celebrated festivals in the winter that including giving gifts to one another long before the birth of Christ.

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