Share Your Experience

five star review
X
Blog
Lombard Office
630-426-0196
Wheaton Office
630-426-0196
Text Us Now
630-426-0196
Subscribe to this list via RSS Blog posts tagged in family law attorney

amicable divorce, divorce law, Arlington Heights divorce attorneyA few weeks ago, a post on this blog talked about "divorce selfie" trend that seemed to exemplify the amicable nature of many modern divorces. For many couples, the decision to end their marriage, while difficult, does not end their ability to work together toward a common goal. An amicable, uncontested divorce can save a couple the hassle and expense of having to sort out their differences in court and greatly streamline the entire process. Regardless of how cooperative you and your spouse can be, however, it is still important to seek the assistance of a qualified divorce attorney for a number of reasons.

Divorce Is Often Complicated

Even though you and your spouse may agree on most of the concerns inherent to the divorce, spelling out an acceptable divorce agreement can be difficult. The division of property, for example, is just one area that can be incredibly complex, with valuations needed for homes, vehicles, retirement accounts and more. While you may not have any disagreements over who is getting what, an attorney can help you develop a legally sound arrangement that clearly designates each and every allocation.

...

domestic violence programThe Chicago Police Department responds to almost 500 domestic violence calls every day. In 2013, approximately 1,500 of those calls involved aggravated domestic battery, where the abuser attacked his or her victim with a gun, knife, or other dangerous weapon.

The City of Chicago recently expanded a pilot domestic violence program that has been in effect since last year. The program takes a more proactive response approach by police, prosecutors and social services agencies and providers.

The program was first introduced to the Chicago Police Department’s 14th Division. The aim of the program is to enable law enforcement to identify households which may be at an elevated risk of domestic violence and serious injuries in order to coordinate a rapid response. An assessment form was developed which asks questions that help determine if a victim is at elevated risk of injury. Patrol officers use these assessment forms when responding to domestic violence calls. If the victim’s answers indicate a serious risk, the department has put protocols in place which activates an immediate investigation.

...

Posted on in Children

cost of adoptionAccording to the U.S. government, it will cost approximately $245,000 to raise a child in this country. However, if that child is adopted, the Child Welfare Information Gateway says parents should add on up to $40,000 – the total amount it could cost to adopt a child.

The Child Welfare Information Gateway is a division of the U.S Department of Health and Human Services. The agency provides information for people who are looking to adopt. According to their statistics, the average cost to adopt can be anywhere between $8,000 and $40,000. For foreign country adoptions, the cost can fall between $15,000 and $30,000. Parents who are seeking to adopt an older child through foster care can anticipate costs from $0 to $2,500.

The largest expense in adoption is usually the adoption agency fee. Adoption agencies match parents to babies and their fees vary greatly. Some agencies will charge a large up-front fee which has everything included. Other agencies will charge a smaller fee, but charge extra for many of the same services agencies that charge larger fees include in their totals.

...

Divorce Effects on Children Juvenile LawThe ramifications of divorce can be numerous, especially if there are adolescent children involved. The psychological effects of divorce during the developmental years can often leave unresolved issues as your children approach their teens and even adulthood. As a parent how you handled the divorce process by ensuring your children had your support and understanding may have not been enough, especially when it comes to your adolescent engaging in risky behavior.

A teen and parent relatable webpage, created by undergraduate student, Ben Beary of Northern Illinois University, under the guidance of J. Elizabeth Miller, Ph.D., School of Family, Consumer and Nutrition Sciences, Northern Illinois University not only states the obvious, 50 percent of all marriages in the U.S. result in divorce.  Also it reiterates that adolescents of divorced families are more likely to experience academic and psychological problems often leading to risky behavior outbreaks.

If you recently divorced and have noticed an increase in undesirable behavior in your son or daughter and legal issues arise, you may require the services of an experienced family law attorney to assist with navigating through the Illinois juvenile system. How do you help your child on a personal level?

...

children of divorce, life after divorce, Illinois family lawyer, Illinois family law attorneyAccording to a study conducted at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, children whose parents are divorced may suffer from low math test scores. The study also revealed that divorce may hamper the development of interpersonal skills in children, as well as cause children to struggle with low self-esteem, sadness, loneliness and anxiety.

The results of the study indicate that children do not suffer with these issues before their parents’ divorce, despite what the home situation is. These problems tend to appear after the breakup has already occurred.

Author of the study, Hyun Sik Kim, studied data provided by the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study. The study tracked 3600 students from kindergarten through fifth grade, beginning in 2008.

...

child abuse, child neglect, DCFS, DCFS investigation, Illinois family lawyer, Illinois family law attorney, child safetyThe prospect of having to undergo a DCFS child abuse or neglect investigation is a horrifying thought to every loving parent out there. Unfortunately, false accusations do occur. If you find yourself facing the prospect of an abuse or neglect investigation, here is what you need to know.

According to the DCFS fact sheet, an investigation is launched 24 hours from the time a report is received. If the allegation is one of neglect or inadequate shelter, an investigative specialist will be dispatched to view the child’s living space. Initially, the specialist’s concern will be for the immediate safety of the child. The child in question and other children in the household will be interviewed along with other household members, extended family members, and other professionals, depending on the allegation. It’s always best to be completely honest and provide complete information to the specialist. In cases where the allegation is of serious physical or sexual abuse, the state law requires the investigative specialist to notify both the local police and the State’s Attorney. In these cases, the police may choose to conduct a joint investigation, or the police may conduct their own investigation. The police may also be contacted if the investigative specialist feels that family members or other concerned individuals are refusing to cooperate with their investigation. The state has a maximum of 60 days to complete their investigation, though most are completed in 30 days. In certain cases, a 60 day extension may be requested, particularly when the state is waiting on medical or police reports. You will be notified in writing of DCFS’ final findings, and the investigative specialist may also contact you. If the allegations are unfounded, the DCFS State Central Register will maintain the information pertaining to the investigation for one to three years. Facing an abuse or neglect allegation can be a frightening experience. Having a qualified family attorney at your side can help. Contact the experienced Lombard, Illinois family attorneys at A. Traub & Associates today for a consultation on your case. We have years of experience defending clients against unfounded abuse and neglect investigations can help you prove your innocence.

adoptionAccording to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, adoption is the process whereby a person assumes parenting for another and, in doing so, permanently transfers all rights and responsibilities, along with filiation, from the biological parent or parents.

In many cases all goes well with the process and integration of the adopted child into a thriving and loving family. So much so that the Adoption USA: National Survey of Adoptive Parents, supports that 81 percent of parents have established a "very warm and close" relationship with their adopted son or daughter. But what happens when  adoption turns out not to be the idyllic family portrait you were hoping for? The most infamous case was that of the young Russian boy who was returned to homeland by his adoptive mother. Another case highlights a former attorney from Spokane, Washington who after much concerted effort decided to place her adopted child, originally from Haiti, up for adoption to preserve the safety of her two younger children. ABC News', senior health and medical editor, Dr. Richard Besser agrees that these cases are heartbreaking, but atypical. Besser reports that 80 to 90 percent of all adoptions are successful and offers the following advice for parents considering adoption: Adjustment Period – take time to let your child relax and become familiar with the family routine. It takes a period of time to determine if any disruptions are due to adjustment issues or if the situation is hindered by a medical or psychological disorder. Realistic Expectations – for parents considering adoption, do not place high expectations on your child from the very beginning. For those children being adoptive from foreign countries, the majority of these children were institutionalized and may need a longer adjustment period. Do Your Homework – before finalizing the adoption, take the time and effort to research and learn as much about your child as possible. Come to know all of the circumstances of their "former" life and then adjust your expectations based on your findings. Rely on a Strong Support Network – enlist family and friends. Join an organized support group and seek out community based services available to families of adoptive children. Besser also recommends using a pediatrician experienced with adopted children. Raising a child, either biological or adopted is a lifelong challenge. No one can predict the outcome or the trials and tribulations along the way. It takes love, compassion, patience and guidance. For the majority of adopted children they will thrive in their environment but for those who have deeper issues that hinder growth development and evoke social and cognitive disorders we can only hope that one day they will find their way. As for the parents who tried we can only applaud their endless effort. If you are considering adoption and reside in the Lombard or Arlington Heights communities, the adoption attorneys of A. Traub & Associates understand your legal and emotional concerns. We are experienced in both domestic and international adoption and can guide you through the process with finalization within a few months. Adoption takes a strong commitment and we understand you also need a strong committed legal team with you every step of the way. For more information on how A. Traub & Associates can help you, contact us at 630-426-0196 for an affordable consultation today.

Posted on in Children

latchkey kidAs the school year progresses, many parents begin to consider the possibility of allowing their child to come home and care for themselves after school. However, many parents worry about the possibility of a DCFS investigation if they choose to allow their child to do this. Luckily, in most cases, there is no reason to worry.

According to the Illinois DCFS, Illinois courts must consider a total of 15 factors when deciding whether a latchkey kid has been the victim of neglect. Those factors are:
  • The child’s age;
  • How many children have been left alone;
  • Whether or not the child had any special needs, including medications;
  • How long the child stayed by themselves;
  • Whether or not the residence where the child was left was a safe and clean environment;
  • What time the minor was left (day, night, etc).
  • Whether the weather conditions presented a hazard to the child at the time, and whether the residence where the child was left provided adequate shelter from those conditions;
  • How far away the parent or guardian was at the time the child was alone;
  • Whether the child’s movements were restricted in any way (being locked into a room, etc.)
  • Whether the child was capable of calling emergency services, and whether or not the child had the means and information to call those services if needed;
  • Whether the child had access to food and water;
  • Any economic circumstances that may have been the cause of the parent leaving the child, and whether the parent made an effort to ensure the child’s safety;
  • Whether or not the parent had left the child in the care of another person;
  • Any other factors that might have presented a danger to the child at the time they were left alone.
In most cases, leaving a child who is mature and capable for an hour or two after school is perfectly legal. Unfortunately, not everyone understands these guidelines and false accusations can be filed. If you find yourself the subject of an Illinois DCFS investigation, it is important to have an attorney to advise you. Contact a qualified Illinois family attorney today for a consultation on your case.

Posted on in Uncategorized

These days, digital dating is becoming more popular every day. According to the Pew Research Center, one in ten Americans has made use of an online dating site or mobile application. Especially if you are recently separated or divorced, online dating can reduce some of the anxiety about getting back into the dating world.

Online dating is certainly not new anymore, but as it becomes used more widely across multiple generations, it’s helpful to have a few tips in the back of your mind to make the most out of your experience. Follow this advice to get your feet wet in the world of online dating:

Take Time To Get To Know Someone

...

Posted on in Children

There’s been quite a bit of buzz in the news lately about the aging population. In fact, it could be argued that the Baby Boomers haven’t made the news in quite this way since their teenage years—and the influx of trend stories does not seem to be slowing any time soon. According to Time magazine, citing statistics from the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), "in 2010 the average life expectancy rose from 78.6 years in 2009 to 78.7 in 2010." But it’s not just that people are living longer—the real boon is that people are staying healthy longer, meaning that the final years of the average American’s life are not spent tied to a hospital bed in pain. David Cutler, the Otto Eckstein Professor of Applied Economics at Harvard told Time that "where we used to see people who are very, very sick for the final six or seven years of their life, that’s now far less common. People are living to older ages and we are adding healthy years, not debilitated ones."  

There’s a lot people can do with the extra time on Earth, and one of them, interestingly enough, is to adopt. According to the Huffington Post, a significant number of Americans are "bucking the idea" that being 50 or 60 is too old to be a parent. Adam Perman, author of "Adoption Nation" told the Huffington Post that the "boomers’ embrace of adoption [is] ‘a trend that’s clearly happening,’ although he does not know of any group tracking the ages of adoptive parents." While there’s not yet research that has polled Boomer adoptions, Pertman believes that a significant contributing reason for this is that "the world has changed, but our biology hasn’t." Women are living well into their 80s, he said. "They can have a child when they are 50 and still live to see their grandkids."

And this could be good news for children who need adopting. Older parents, with more money, and, presumably, patience, "are very often happy—actually seek out—the adoption of an older child. This serves all parties and society," Pertman told the Huffington Post.

...

Children of divorced parents clearly have more hurdles than those from families whose parents are together. Aside from the winter holiday season, at no time in the year is this more obvious than during the summer. Children whose parents have split are often shuttled back and forth between the parents’ houses, oftentimes over state lines, a trip that can feature solo plane rides or long drives. Psychologist Brian Rooney told the Chicago Tribune that trouble in this scenario can arise for children of divorce because of their expectations. "They can range from realistic ones like, ‘Gee, I can’t wait to get away to Dad/Mom’s house, we’re going to do all kinds of stuff,’ to a feeling of being sent away to serve time." Rooney says it’s important for both parents to address these expectations and consider them when making summer plans with and for children of divorce.

In order to manage these expectations and subsequent emotions, the most important thing to do is to plan ahead, keep promises, and not to overblow or underemphasize the importance of the time apart. According to divorceandchildren.com, talking to your kids—especially if you’re the non-custodial parent who’s spending a significantly increased amount of time with your kids over the summer—is a good first step. If you make plans with them to go on vacation, or even just to the museum for the afternoon, it’s crucial to follow through. "Children need to be able to count on your word," reminds divorceandchildren.com.

Another great piece of advice for the non-custodial (but summer-sharing) parent to keep in mind is to not overdo it. "Sometimes parents may feel guilty about not having enough time with their children. When this happens, they may fall into the trap of trying to pack every moment of their time together with fun-filled, exciting activities," reports divorceandchildren.com. When this happens, the child can actually feel overwhelmed and run-around. The most important thing a child needs is quality one-on-one time with the parent. The time doesn’t have to be filled with activity to make it count.

...

Cook County courthouses are shunning the American tradition of keeping family law cases open and public, according to the Chicago Tribune. There have been several cases as of late to pass through Illinois public courts that have been sealed or kept closed from the public, according to the Tribune, "despite a rich tradition of openness in the U.S. court system." Closed courts, or cases in which initials are used instead of full names, are most often utilized by the rich and famous to keep their identities private and avoid media coverage. One such case like this is that of former state lawmaker and county commissioner John Fritchey, who is noted on divorce records simply as J.F. His former wife, Karen Banks Fritchey, "who comes from an influential political family," was listed on the documents as K.F.

According to the Tribune, "legal experts said cases should remain open and identities should be shielded only in exceptional instances. Entire case files should not be hidden because individuals want privacy or because they might be embarrassed." This is especially true in a society in which divorce is growing more acceptable. According to a 2008 Gallup Values and Beliefs survey, the percentage of Americans who reported that divorce is morally acceptable was up to 70 percent, "up from 59 percent in 2001, and breaking the previous high of 67 percent in 2006." In fact, tolerance for divorce was comparable to acceptance of "gambling, the death penalty, embryonic stem-cell research, and premarital sex."

And yet according to Psychology Today, "in our modern American culture, divorce is still seen as a negative life event—even taboo." This is mostly brought on by the people closest to those going through a divorce; "the attitudes and actions of friends, family, and acquaintances in reaction to hearing of the split can leave "dissolutioners" feeling isolated, marginalized, and rejected." Perhaps this is why people in the public spotlight, regardless of whether it’s right nor not, are opting for closed court cases when going through a divorce.

...

While one long-held stereotype in America about divorce is a scenario in which the middle-aged husband leaves his wife for a much younger woman, statistics show otherwise. According to a AARP The Magazine survey launched a couple of years ago, "66 percent of women claimed to have initiated their split." The survey was conducted, according to the Anchorage Daily News, over more than a thousand divorced men and women, ages 40 to 79.

The age of the participants in the survey could definitely have something do with it. Attitudes and expectations of marriage and gender roles have continued to change in America, especially in the decades since their marriages. Marriage counselor Willard Harley told the Anchorage Daily News that husbands "often feel that the expectations of women in general, and their wives in particular, have grown completely out of reach."

While the stereotype that men were seeking a split may not be true, the age-old stereotype that women are more perceptive and attune to small emotional shifts may hold water. The specific finding that women are more likely to initiate divorce comes ion the heels of a larger AARP finding that "women seemed more in tune with the danger signs of a problem marriage." Men were far more likely to be caught off-guard by an ending marriage.

...
Illinois State Bar Association DuPage County Bar Association Northwest Suburban Bar Association American Inns of Court DuPage Association of Woman Lawyers National Association of Woman Business Owners Illinois Association Criminal Defense Lawyers DuPage County Criminal Defense Lawyers Association
Back to Top