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Lombard trusts attorneysA trust is an estate planning tool that can hold property for the benefit of beneficiaries. There are many different types of trusts that can serve a wide range of purposes. Trusts fall into two main categories: revocable trusts and irrevocable trusts. A revocable trust is created by a grantor during his or her lifetime and may then be modified or revoked at any time. Irrevocable trusts, on the other hand, cannot be charged or revoked after their creation. However, there are certain situations in which an irrevocable trust can be modified or terminated.

Benefits of an Irrevocable Trust

Many people choose to use a trust to transfer assets to a beneficiaries instead of a will. The person who makes the will, called the grantor, transfers property to the trust and designates a trustee to manage the trust. Once the grantor passes away, the assets held by the trust are distributed to beneficiaries. The beneficiaries of a trust may be family members, friends, or entities such as nonprofit organizations. When the grantor transfers assets to an irrevocable trust, he or she relinquishes control of these assets and the assets are now owned by the trust. Because the assets are no longer owned by the grantor, they no longer influence the grantor’s tax liability or the value of his or her estate. Irrevocable trusts also offer protection from creditors and lawsuits.

Modifying an Irrevocable Trust

There are only a few different ways that an irrevocable trust may be modified or revoked. The trustee or beneficiary of a trust may petition the court to request a trust modification or revocation. The Illinois Virtual Representation Statute allows certain trustees and beneficiaries to alter an irrevocable trust without having to go through the court. The easiest and most straightforward way to change or revoke a trust is for the grantor and all potential beneficiaries to agree to the change and sign a consent modification document. A grantor may also be able to petition the court to revoke a trust based on mistake. For example, if there is evidence that the grantor was told that the trust would be revocable, the court may allow the trust to be terminated.

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Lombard living trusts attorneyWhen you are beginning to prepare an estate plan, it is important to remember that you are not just planning for the time after your death. An estate plan is necessary for more than just the rich—though that designation can be quite misleading. An estate plan is an outline set up by anyone—including those in lower- and middle-class income sectors—that determines what will happen to one’s assets and property. For those who may tend toward the higher end of the socioeconomic spectrum, it may be in your best interest to establish a living trust, which is a tool that can be used to manage your assets while you are still alive. Among other benefits, living trusts can useful in protecting certain assets and maintaining eligibility for government financial aid programs such as Medicare and Medicaid.

Two Types of Living Trusts

There are two main types of living trusts: irrevocable and revocable. The vast majority of living trusts are revocable, meaning that they can be amended or revoked at any time by the creator. When you create a living trust, the assets you select are transferred to the trust and ownership is in the trust’s name rather than in the name of an individual. Your designated trustee then administers the trust, meaning that the trustee makes decisions for the leveraging, sale, or gift of any assets in the trust. Most people name themselves the trustee of their own living trusts, meaning that there is essentially no difference in the way that one administers his or her own assets—only that they are now technically owned under the umbrella of the trust.

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Lombard estate planning lawyerWhile you may not know the specific requirements that make one valid in the eyes of the law, you are probably familiar the concept of a will. You most likely realize that most people use a will to specify how their assets will be handled after their death. Many individuals also utilize trusts in the process of estate planning. But, what exactly is a trust and how can they help with your estate planning needs?

What Is a Trust?

A trust, at its most basic, is a fiduciary relationship that allows a person—a trustor—to give the right to hold property or assets to another person—a trustee—for the benefit of a third party or parties. There are several types of trusts that are commonly used in estate planning, but each of them has a similar structure. Assets and property are typically placed in a trust to be distributed at a later date—or over time—to the trustor’s named beneficiaries.

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