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Lombard estate planning lawyerPeople often wonder whether they can handwrite their will or change their will by writing in new provisions or crossing things out. To be clear, if you want to be sure that your will is followed exactly after your death, all changes should be made with the help of your attorney. That said, whether you can handwrite a will or make handwritten changes to a will depends primarily on where you live and where your will is to be executed upon your death.

Jurisdiction Matters  

The validity of a handwritten will depends on the laws of the state in which you reside. Many states recognize handwritten wills as potentially valid, but each state may have different witness requirements. Witnesses ensure that you have the mental capacity and intent to make a will and that you, in fact, were the one to sign it. In some jurisdictions, a witness does not need to be present for a handwritten will to be valid. This type of will is known as a holographic will. In other jurisdictions, two witnesses must be present.

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Lombard estate planning lawyerWhen you are dealing with the loss of a family member or loved one, financial and property considerations may be the furthest thing from your mind. In the weeks that follow, however, your intense emotions are likely to subside, giving you the space to think about your loved one’s estate and his or her will. Depending on your relationship to the person and his or her accumulated property, you may be expecting a sizable inheritance. But what happens if the terms of the will are not what you expected? What if your inheritance is less than you were promised? According to Illinois law, you may have the option of contesting your loved one’s will, but doing so may not always be the best choice.

Contesting a Will

The law provides certain people with the right to file a will contest, including those who would have some claim to the decedent’s estate if the person had died without a will as well as those named in previous wills. This means that if the person who died was a family friend rather than a relative and you were never named in any version of his or her will, you have no standing to contest the final will.

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